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Atrazine Is As Serious As Glyphosate On Your Health

Photo Credit by James Qualtrough

For years now Atrazine (an herbicide that is widely used to kill weeds) is the second most used herbicide to Glyphosate. Pure atrazine-an odorless, the white powder-is not reactive, volatile, or flammable. It will dissolve in water. Atrazine is not natural at all as it is man made in the laboratory. Atrazine is most commonly used on corn, especially in the Midwest but, it is also used on crops like sugarcane, pasture grasses, winter wheat, pineapples, sorghum, and macadamia nuts, and on evergreen tree farms and for evergreen forest regrowth. Some of the trade names are Aatrex®, Aatram®, Atratol®, and Gesaprim. It can also be found in parks, golf courses, industrial areas, residential lawns and more. Atrazine also is ending up in rivers, streams and drinking water supplies.

The European Union (EU) has already banned Atrazine in 2004 and it also includes Switzerland, where Atrazine’s manufacturer, Syngenta, is headquartered. Here it is 2017 and we still don’t have a ban on it in the US? Geez, I am so shocked!

Did you know the common weed killer Roundup’s (Glyphosate) and “inert” ingredients can kill human cells, particularly embryonic, placental and umbilical cord cells? Approximately 4,000 “inert” ingredients are approved for use by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Caroline Cox, research director of the Center for Environmental Health, an Oakland-based environmental organization states “federal law classifies all pesticide ingredients that don’t harm pests as “inert,” she said. “Inert” compounds, therefore, aren’t necessarily biologically or toxicologically harmless – they simply don’t kill insects or weeds.” Caroline Cox cannot do tests on humans of course, so they test on other species.

According to Dr. Mercola, “more than 73 million pounds of it are applied to golf courses, lawns, and food crops each year. As just one example of its prevalence, as much as 80 percent of all the herbicides used in Vermont are atrazine-based.”

Atrazine is most commonly used on corn, especially in the Midwest but, it is also used on crops like sugarcane, pasture grasses, winter wheat, pineapples, sorghum, and macadamia nuts, and on evergreen tree farms and for evergreen forest regrowth. Some of the trade names are Aatrex®, Aatram®, Atratol®, and Gesaprim. It can also be found in parks, golf courses, industrial areas, residential lawns and more. Atrazine also is ending up in rivers, streams and drinking water supplies.

 

In a report by the Minnesota Department of Health in a study for acute and short-term durations are based on developmental and reproductive effects. The results are as follows: Developmental, reproductive and multigenerational studies in animals show that exposure to atrazine leads to decreased fetal body weight, decreased litter size, and increased incidence of incomplete ossification. Rats showed the greatest sensitivity to atrazine in a multigenerational study, with a critical effect of decreased body weight in two generations.

In 1993 an agricultural study by the National Cancer Institute showed that “compared with the general population, the rates for certain diseases, including some types of cancer, appear to be higher among agricultural workers, which may be related to exposures that are common in their work environments. For example, farming communities have higher rates of leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and soft tissue sarcoma, as well as cancers of the skin, lip, stomach, brain, and prostate.”

Temple Journal of Science Technical & Environmental law states that EDC’s are toxic because they disrupt the normal function of the endocrine system. The endocrine system includes all hormone-secreting glands and regulates blood sugar, growth and function of reproductive systems, metabolism, development of the brain, and development of the nervous system. Most of these systems work on the principle of homeostasis or balance. Endocrine systems manage and regulate a number of hormones in the body. Endocrine systems have receptors that detect excess or inadequate amounts of hormones in the body and then react through a series of negative and positive feedback loops to keep the body in homeostasis.  Endocrine systems can be found in most animals, not only mammals, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, snails, lobsters, and insects.

What can you do to lower these toxins?

  • Vacuum carpets, mop floors, and damp-wipe dusty surfaces weekly.
  • Don’t use pesticides in or around your house
  • Remove shoes before entering your house.
  • Have your water tested, in the spring.
  • Don’t let your kids play, swim or dig near or in fields that have been sprayed.
  • If you use formula versus breast milk, make sure you mix it with purified water.
  • If you work in fields, wearing proper clothing and protective gear is essential.

 

References:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/10/19/atrazine-health-effects.aspx

http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/risk/studies/atrazfinaldoc.pdf

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/epa-atrazine-herbicide/

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/weed-whacking-herbicide-p/

http://www.ceh.org/?option=com_content&task=view&id=28&Itemid=14

https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/ahs-fact-sheet

http://www.healthychild.org/easy-steps/avoid-the-herbicide-atrazine/

https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/phs/phs.asp?id=336&tid=59