Anti-aging foods, Beauty

12 ways to slow the aging process with food, fewer calories and exercise

 

Young WomanBeauty isn’t just skin deep. Total body wellness is just as important as skin deep. I realize cosmetic surgery is a fast way of completing the exterior process, but you need to help the inner as well. If you want your muscles, cells, and organs to function properly, nourishing them is just as important. Foods rich in antioxidants prevent oxidative stress and get rid of aging free radicals.

New studies have shown that also eating less can slow the aging process by cutting calories which slows down the aging process in our cells. Cells make proteins which when slowed down ribosomes have time to repair themselves.

  1. Green Tea – Rich in antioxidants helps with free radicals that can cause wrinkles and other signs of aging.
  2. Lemon Juice – Removes marks from your skin and can aid in helping your nails look brighter and whiter.
  3. Fruit – Citrus fruits are full of antioxidants
  4. Apple Cider Vinegar – For acne and scars, it cleans your skin when rubbed on the face gently.
  5. Nuts– Cell membranes are rich in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats which are essential fatty acids.
  6. Bell Peppers – Full of Vitamin A, a huge contributor for healthy and glowing skin.
  7. Cinnamon – Helps in burning fat in the body.
  8. Cruciferous vegetables – Such as broccoli, cauliflower, and Brussels sprouts are rich in sulfur and antioxidants.
  9. Grains – Oats, brown rice, and quinoa – are not stripped of their nutrient-rich germ and bran layers in the way refined grains have.
  10. Tomatoes – Tomatoes are one of the richest sources of lycopene, a powerful antioxidant (it’s also found in carrots, watermelon, and other red vegetables and fruits).
  11. Fish – Mackerel, sardines, and salmon (oily fish) contain omega-3 fatty acids, which can help combat inflammation in the body.
  12. Exercise regularly – Almost any amount and type of physical activity may slow aging deep within our cells, a new study finds.

I always say that eating healthy is the answer to not giving the Big Pharma our hard earned money and you can look beautiful as well. Couldn’t hurt, right?

 

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17 Impressive Benefits of Rosemary(2 min read)

matt-montgomery-3790 (2)Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a fragrant perennial evergreen herb with needle-like leaves with white, pink, blue or purple flowers native to the Mediterranean. The name rosemary derives from the Latin ros meaning “dew” and marinus meaning “sea”, “sea dew.” Rosemary is a member of the mint family Lamiaceae, along with many other herbs, such as oregano, thyme, basil, and lavender.  Rosemary is a good source of iron, calcium, and vitamin B-6.

Rosemary has been used for thousands of years for medicinal purposes along with used in recipes for cooking.

For your hair, rubbing rosemary herb extractions over the scalp to stimulate the hair-bulbs, prevent premature baldness and dandruff.

Rosemary has been tested in clinical studies on the list below and has shown positive feedback from them.

Health Benefits of Rosemary

  • Improve mood
  • Relieve pain
  • Protect the immune system
  • Stimulate circulation
  • Detoxify the body
  • Bacterial infections
  • Premature aging
  • Skin conditions
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Anti-oxidant
  • Memory and concentration
  • Digestion
  • Neurological
  • Cancer
  • Alzheimer’s
  • Macular degeneration
  • Hair

Caution:  The essential oil of rosemary is not to be consumed. You can consume rosemary as we have for thousands of years in culinary aspects, but again, not as an essential oil. Don’t forget rosemary is in the mint family, so if you are allergic, be careful.

References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3624774/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3736918/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20377818

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3905473/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4227022/

http://www.amd.org/macular-degeneration-research/clinical-trials-for-wet-amd/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5133115/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23921795

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25002023

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3569896/