Bloating

20 Natural Ways to get Rid of Bloating

Bloating

Many people complain about intestinal gas, but what one person complains about, may not mean what the other person is complaining about. To understand how the gastrointestinal tract works and how you are being affected is important to make the necessary changes to improve or prevent this in the future.

When you eat or drink, a small amount of air is carried into the stomach. When you eat food, it is then churned into small fragments, which then go into the intestine. After your stomach empties the small intestine it contracts moving everything south. And when it goes south is when you absorb food’s nutrition, such as minerals, calories, and vitamins. The liquid that becomes indigestible waste then goes into the large colon (bowel). Water from the liquid fragments is then reabsorbed and this is how stool formed.

If you follow a simple diet and lifestyle changes you may be able to reduce gastrointestinal gas and relieve symptoms.

Females are more likely to get intestinal bloating after eating than men. Aren’t we lucky!  Bloating is caused poor or disorganized contractions. Also, if the muscles are too relaxed, this can cause bloating as well.

A condition in which there are disorganized movement and spasm of the bowel is called Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Your stomach can bloat from eating too quickly and your stomach not being happy with what you just fed it.

We already know that beans and milk cause bloating, but I’ve compiled a starter list below to give you a little knowledge on what foods can trigger bloating.

Vegetables

  • Cabbage
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Cucumbers
  • Kale
  • Sauerkraut
  • Kohlrabi
  • Asparagus
  • Radishes
  • Onions
  • Potatoes
  • Rutabaga
  • Turnips
  • Garlic

Fruits

  • Prunes
  • Apricots
  • Raisins
  • Bananas
  • Apples
  • Fatty Foods
  • Pan-fried or deep-fried foods
  • Fatty meats
  • Cream sauces
  • Gravies
  • Pastries

Liquids

  • Carbonated beverages
  • Powders
  • Medications
  • Dairy Products

Natural ways to help bloating

  1. Let the gas leave the body. Yes, fart!
  2. Drink Peppermint Tea
  3. Eat ginger
  4. Eat some caraway seeds
  5. Drink some chamomile tea
  6. Take some activated charcoal
  7. Eat pumpkin
  8. Drink warm lemon water
  9. Chew your food thoroughly
  10. No talking while chewing
  11. Exercise
  12. Eat anise seed
  13. Take probiotics
  14. Don’t drink cold beverages while eating
  15. Reduce salt
  16. Do not eat fruits after a meal
  17. Eat digestive enzymes
  18. Treat constipation
  19. Eat smaller amounts of food
  20. Meditation

References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16143143

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3388350/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3264926/

 

 

 

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Argan Oil

10 WONDERFUL and BENEFICIAL uses of Argan Oil for your hair and skin (3 minute read)

argan tree

Argan oil is from the Argan (Argania spinosa) tree endemic to southwestern Morocco. The fruit from the tree has an oleaginous kernel that has “argan oil” in it. I’m sure you’ve heard that it is known as “liquid gold” or “Moroccan miracle oil” and there are reasons for that. It has been used for centuries in Morocco as a cosmetic oil to maintain a fair complexion, to cure skin pimples and chicken pox scars. It is also used for culinary reasons to add a nut flavor. However, keep in mind that for cosmetic uses, it needs to be cold pressed versus roasted.

Argan opil

In this day and age and after many studies, we have found that there are many other uses for the “liquid gold”  or “Moroccan miracle oil,” as well.

Reasons to use Argan Oil

Acne – The triterpenoids naturally found in Argan oil have amazing health benefits for skin including the treatment of mild acne and acne-related scarring.

Psoriasis – Argan oil’s hydrating effects can make psoriasis feel better by adding much-needed moisture.

Eczema – Rubbing this into the skin after a shower will help lock in moisture and stop the itching.

Sun – Applying Argan oil can regenerate cells caused by UV damaged skin. It fades sun spots and heals dry skin that looks dry and leathery. Cancer – Compounds in Argan Oil are called triterpenoids. Triterpenoids are phytochemicals also known as isoprenoids. These are secondary metabolites. Many studies conducted have shown that metabolites are toxic to tumor growth.

Arthritis – Found to be particularly helpful with those that suffer from rheumatoid arthritis from the oil when massaged into the skin.

Hair – Argon Oil is well known to help dry hair. Use it overnight as an intense hair treatment or use it as a leave-in to help moisturize, during the day. It is great for split ends.

Skin – Argan Oil has approx. 80% fatty acids, which have been proven to erase crow’s feet and wrinkles by using it regularly which increases elasticity and by increasing the regenerative rate of healthy skin cells. So for an older woman for example, who have had your insides removed, it protects you from the sun, gives you elasticity, which promotes smoother skin and protects you from free radicals.

Burns and wounds – In a clinical study on rats, argan oil showed significant aid in burns and wounds.

Brittle fingernails – Rub some into your cuticles and fingernails to moisturize.

Antioxidant – Argan Oil has flavonoids and vitamin E which is incorporated into cell membranes, which protects them from oxidative damage. Flavonoids have shown potential in the treatment of breast, colon, prostate, pancreas, lung, and other related cancers.

argan nuts

What makes Argan oil so effective?

Tocopherols (Vitamin E) – organic chemical compounds

Fatty Acids – A large group of monobasic acids found in animals and plants.

Polyphenols / Ferulic Acid – Organic compounds containing more than one phenol group; responsible for the color and flavor of some fruits and vegetables; may have antioxidant properties.

Phytosterols – Plant sterols and stanols that inhibit the absorption of cholesterol from the small intestine and, in effect, lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in humans.

Triterpene – Any of various unsaturated hydrocarbons, C10H16, found in essential oils and oleoresins of plants such as conifers and used in organic syntheses.

Squalene – A hexaisoprenoid (triterpenoid) hydrocarbon; intermediate in the biosynthesis of cholesterol and other sterols and triterpenes; found in shark oil and in some plants.

 

References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3723062/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4321565/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3723062/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17524128

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3182282/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/labs/articles/26978857/

 

Copper

Interesting facts about copper and the human body

Copper CuCopper is one of the essential minerals needed by all humans. It maintains blood volume, produces energy in cells and builds tissues in the body.

Health Benefits of Copper

Bones and tissues – Copper is essential for the formation of strong and flexible connective tissues. Cuproenzyme, lysyl oxidase, two important structural proteins that cross-link collagen and elastin to form strong and flexible connective tissues. Lysyl oxidase helps in maintaining the integrity of connective tissue in the heart and blood vessels and plays a role in bone formation.

Antioxidant protector – Studies have shown that dietary intake in most people is insufficient. Taking copper with iron builds red blood cells. Copper neutralizes free radicals and may reduce or help prevent some of the damage they cause.
Balances cholesterol – Copper has shown to reduce LDL cholesterol (bad) and increase HDL cholesterol (good).

Boosts energy – When you speed up the molecular oxygen (O2) to water (H2O), cytochrome c oxidase generates an electrical gradient used by the mitochondria to create the vital energy-storing molecule, ATP.

Brain Stimulator – Food with more copper in it, is known as “brain food”. A study showed that there are higher thought processes, enables neural pathways and enables us to think creatively.

 

Copper deficiency can be inherited or acquired from malnutrition, malabsorption, or excessive zinc intake. Copper deficiency is most common caused by gastrointestinal surgery, such as gastric bypass surgery, due to malabsorption of copper, or zinc toxicity.

Deficiencies of copper could include:

Anemia
Low body temperature
Bone fractures
Osteoporosis
Low white blood cell count
Irregular heartbeat
Loss of pigment from the skin
Thyroid problems

Foods rich in Copper
Oysters
Soybeans
Lentils
Walnuts
Tempeh
Garbanzo Beans
Sunflower seeds
Mushrooms/Shitake

I always say the best way to get enough copper or other minerals is through your diet. For your body to use copper, you need to have a balance of zinc and manganese. The following lists provide the recommended daily dietary intake of copper for children and adults from the Food and Nutrition Board at the Institute of Medicine.

Pediatric
For infants from birth to 6 months: 200 mcg daily
For infants 7 to 12 months: 220 mcg daily
For children 1 to 3 years: 340 mcg daily
For children 4 to 8 years: 440 mcg daily
For children 9 to 13 years: 700 mcg daily
For children 14 to 18 years: 890 mcg daily

Adult

For adults 19 years and older: 900 mg daily
For pregnant women: 1,000 mcg daily
For breastfeeding women: 1,300 mcg daily
If you take a copper supplement, you should also take a zinc supplement.  Speaking to your doctor is always best.

References:

http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=7526434
http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/copper
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9587142
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/minerals/copper
https://www.omicsonline.org/copper-and-zinc-biological-role-and-significance-of-copper-zincimbalance-2161-0495.S3-001.php?aid=3055
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8364505
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3690345/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17367269
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0925443911001426

 

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10 Interesting Health Benefits of Phosphorus (2 minute read)

phosphorus

Phosphorous is one of the most abundant minerals in your body, next to calcium. These two minerals work together to building strong bones and teeth. Did you know that 85% of phosphorus is found in your bones and teeth? Phosphorus is a key mineral that helps filter out waste through the kidneys and plays an essential role in how the body uses and stores energy. It is also needed for the production of our genetic building blocks, RNA (ribonucleic acid) and DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), maintenance, repair and growth of our cells and tissues.

Taking a calcium supplement could interfere with the absorption of phosphorus. So it is important to understand the RDA. According to the Australian Government National Health and Medical Research, the RDA of Phosphorus is:

  • Adults need 1000 milligrams of phosphorus daily
  • Children between the ages of 9 and 18 need 1,250 milligrams per day because bone development and formation is rapid at this stage of life
  • Children ages 4 to 8 need 500 milligrams per day
  • Children ages 1 to 3 need 460 milligrams per day
  • Children ages 7 to 12 months need 275 milligrams per day
  • Infants 0 to 6 months should have 100 milligrams per day

Health Benefits of Phosphorus

  1. Helps the production of bone by helping with phosphorylation, which is a chemical process linked to amino acids signaling proteins which stimulate the growth of bone.
  2. Helps in stimulating glands to balance the hormones.
  3. Filters out waste in your kidneys
  4. Helps with digestion
  5. Is an electrolyte
  6. Maintain, grow and repair tissue and cells
  7. Help with muscle contraction
  8. Helps maintain a regular heartbeat
  9. Urination and excretion
  10. Aids in proper brain functioning and cognitive growth

It is important to speak to a nutritional specialist to find out what foods are high in phosphorus, but here are a few foods rich in phosphorus. Meat, legumes, nuts, peanut butter, tuna, pork, sunflower seeds, rice, white bread, potatoes, peas, broccoli and dairy products are a few foods that are rich in phosphorous.

Health conditions such as diabetes, starvation, and alcoholism can cause levels of phosphorus in the body to fall.

Crohn’s disease and celiac disease make it difficult for the body to absorb nutrients.

Symptoms of phosphorus deficiency include:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Anxiety,
  • Bone pain
  • Fragile bones
  • Stiff joints
  • Fatigue
  • Irregular breathing
  • Irritability
  • Numbness
  • Weakness

Studies suggest that too much phosphorus in your body (which is more common), can do more damage than having too little phosphorus in your body. If you don’t consume enough calcium with phosphorus it can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. “There is a very delicate balance between calcium and phosphorus is necessary for proper bone density and prevention of osteoporosis”, according to a study at the University of Maryland Medical Center

 

References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2486454/

http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/phosphorus

 

Pistachio

9 Surprising Facts About The Pistachio Nut

Pistachio

 

 

Pistachio Nuts were a common food since 6750 BC. They are a member of the cashew family and originate from Asia and the Middle East.

Pistachios are eaten whole, salted, roasted or fresh.  Pistachios are also used in ice cream, butter, and a paste.

Pistachios not only taste great but have nutrients carbohydrates, proteins, fats, dietary fiber, phosphorus, potassium, thiamine, vitamin B-6, beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin, calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc, copper, manganese, vitamin C, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, folate, vitamin E, vitamin A, and vitamin K.

Out of all the nuts out there, pistachios contain the highest amounts of potassium, γ-tocopherol, vitamin K, phytosterols, and xanthophyll carotenoids.  Clinical studies suggest that pistachios help maintain healthy antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, glycemic control, and endothelial function. When consumed in moderation, pistachios may help control body weight because of their satiety and satiation effects and their reduced net metabolizable energy content.

In another study pistachios (roasted) have a lower fat content than any of the other nuts out there.

Health benefits of pistachios include aiding in

Type 2 diabetes – Pistachio nuts as a snack has beneficial effects on glycemic control, according to a study.

Heart Health – Pistachios have been studied for many years in reference to cardiovascular disease. Studies show a significant drop in cholesterol when consuming pistachios. Five published randomized cardiovascular trials have shown that pistachios promote heart-healthy blood lipid profiles.

Blood Pressure – Pistachios are rich in mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids, which may reduce hyperglycemia and improve metabolism.

Weight loss – Researchers found that pistachios have satiety and satiation effects. Another study with individuals in a weight loss program demonstrated lower body mass index and triglyceride levels who consumed pistachios versus pretzels. Epidemiological studies have failed to find any association between nut or pistachio consumption and either weight gain or an increased risk of obesity

Cancer – Pistachios have vitamin E and other antioxidants in them may reduce the risk of cancer.

Absorbing Iron – A study conducted found that pistachios are high in copper, which helps the body absorb more iron therefore helping in not getting anemia.

Improved Digestion – In a study, they suggest pistachios have prebiotic characteristics and contain non-digestible food components such as dietary fiber, which remains in the gut and serve as food for naturally occurring bacteria.  Pistachios also contain phytochemicals that could modify microbiota composition. Foods with prebiotic properties may enhance the growth of beneficial bacteria in the digestive tract.

Fiber – A serving of about 1 ounce or 30 grams of pistachios contains about 3 grams of dietary fiber, more than enough to get your digestive tracts working at excellent capacity.

Erectile Dysfunction – Turkish researchers revealed results from a study that eating 3-1/2 ounces of pistachio nuts a day for 3 weeks led to improved sexual function in men with ED.

Uncategorized

Want an Organic Soap that Lightens and Moisturizes?

Dr. Woods Rose Soap (2)

I’ve been trying lightening soaps for a little over a year now and I was incredibly surprised by Dr. Woods’s Skin Lightening Rose Soap.

Dr. Woods makes a variety of soaps, but I tried the Skin Lightening Rose Bar on my face and I absolutely love it! I was surprised because a little over a year now, I’ve been on the hunt for an organic soap that could help with a darker tint around my cheek area.

I used Dr. Woods Skin Lightening Rose bar for approximately a week and started noticing an incredible difference. My cheeks didn’t look like they already had blush on them and it effectively lightened my overall skin and faded some dark spots under my eyes. It cleaned my face very nicely and to top it off, it is nicely priced and won’t break the bank.

What I really love about this soap, is that it has shea butter and coconut oil to moisturize my skin, apricot powder for exfoliating and green tea extract for its clarifying qualities. This soap is incredibly moisturizing and contains vitamins A and E to combat dryness and restore elasticity to the skin, which helps in aging skin or as a preventative to skin aging.

Dr. Woods is made in the U.S.A. and doesn’t contain any toxins, which makes me very happy.  It is free of gluten, paraben, phthalate, lauryl/laurel sulfate, petroleum derivatives and animal testing. This soap has milk in it so for those who are vegan, I’d like you to know that Dr. Woods carries a variety of soaps that are vegan free.

Ingredients:

Saponified Mass Balance Sustainable Palm Oil, Saponified Coconut Oil, Water, Retained Vegetable Glycerin, Organic Fair Trade Shea Butter, English Rose Fragrance, Apricot Powder, Almond Oil, Natural Mineral Pigment, Green Tea Extract, Aloe Vera Gel, Powdered Milk, Niacinamide, Mulberry Extract, Apple Extract, Rose Hip Oil, Licorice Extract, Vitamin A, Organic Tocopherol (Vitamin E), Sodium Gluconate, Rosemary Extract, Sodium Chloride.

Don’t worry about the word fragrance above in the ingredients, as it comes from 100% natural essential oils.

Give it a try and let me know if it helped you with overall skin lightening, dark spots or if you just love the moisturizing aspect of it.

 

 

MInt

9 Healing Benefits of Mint

mint-2220631_640 (2)

Mint also is known as Peppermint (Mentha x Piperita) It is used in many culinary dishes, as well as, in soaps and cosmetics for aromatic reasons. It is grown throughout Europe and North America.

Mint has been used for thousands of years for many health purposes. Peppermint leaf is available in teas, capsules, and as a liquid extract.

Today researchers know that it aids in many things.

  1. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) – A study found that taking peppermint enteric-coated capsules, may help in reducing pain associated with IBS (thought to relieve flatulence, abdominal pain, and distension).
  2. Digestive problemsStudies have shown that peppermint taken with caraway oil may help relieve indigestion. You can also drink peppermint tea, as many people do for indigestion.
  3. Asthma and the common cold – cold – Rubbing mint on your forehead, under the nose, and on your chest can relieve bronchial and respiratory disorders from the scent of peppermint. Rosmarinic acid is found in peppermint leaves which are helpful with inflammatory issues with people suffering from asthma.
  4. Headaches – Peppermint oil is also used topically for tension headaches (applied to the scalp) for fast headache relief.
  5. Reducing spasm during gastrointestinal procedures – A study conducted as a consequence of its relaxing properties on smooth muscle, peppermint oil has given, via enema, has been examined in two trials as a means to reduce symptoms of gastrointestinal spasm during the administration of barium enema and possibly during colonoscopy.
  6. Prostate Cancer – Peppermint contains menthol, which may inhibit the growth of prostate cancer.
  7. Stress – Peppermint oil is used in the bath (few drops) or as aromatherapy to have almost instant stress relief.
  8. Muscle Pain – Rub some peppermint oil on your sore or painful muscles or you can add some to your bath (few drops).
  9. Nausea – Peppermint oil can effectively help with nausea in general and people undergoing chemotherapy-induced nausea.

Cautions:

Possible side effects of peppermint oil include heartburn and allergic reactions like a headache, nausea, blurred vision and mouth sores. I mentioned above about enteric-coated to reduce the likeliness of heartburn. Do not take with antacids, as the coating on the enteric-coating can break down.

When taken orally peppermint oil appears to be safe in common doses. If you overtake peppermint oil, it can be toxic, so just be careful and make sure you know common doses.

Recommended daily allowance Adults: 0.2 to 0.4 mL of oil three times daily in enteric-coated capsules

Children older than eight years: 0.1 to 0.2 mL three times daily according to American Family Physician.

Like other essential oils, peppermint oil is highly concentrated. When the undiluted essential oil is used for health purposes, only a few drops are used.

Side effects of applying peppermint oil to the skin can include skin rashes and irritation. Peppermint oil should not be applied to the face or chest of infants or young children because serious side effects may occur if they inhale the menthol in the oil.

No harmful effects from studies of peppermint leaf tea have been reported. However, the long-term safety of consuming large amounts of peppermint leaf is unknown.

Chia Seeds

8 Wonderful Benefits of Chia Seeds

CHIA (2)

Chia Seeds are grown in Mexico and South America. Mayan and Aztec cultures used chia seeds because they were known to have supernatural powers. “Chia” is the ancient Mayan word for “strength.”

These tiny black, brown, gray and white seeds are an excellent source of you Omega 3 fatty acids. They help in raising your HDL cholesterol, which is the good cholesterol. They also have almost no flavor to them, which makes them nice to add to beverages and food. If you do taste a flavor, it may have a slightly nutty flavor.

Chia seeds are full of antioxidants, high in protein, have vitamins A, B, E and D. Chia seeds are also full of minerals such as calcium, phosphorus, potassium copper, iron, manganese, magnesium, niacin, thiamine and more.

Antioxidants are vitamins, minerals and other nutrients that may protect your cells from the effects of free radicals. Free radicals are molecules produced when your body breaks down food for energy. Free radicals can damage cells, weaken the immune system and may help in getting heart disease, arthritis, cancer and other diseases.

DoctorsHealthPress.com suggest for various age groups the amount listed below:

  • Adults can eat 15 to 20 grams (approximately two to three tablespoons) of chia seeds, whole or ground, per day. This will provide the daily requirement for needed omega-3s.
  • Adults can eat 15 to 20 grams (approximately two to three tablespoons) of chia seeds, whole or ground, per day. This will provide the daily requirement for omega-3s.
  • Children and teens from ages 10 to 18 can eat up to 10 grams of chia seeds per day.
  • Children under 10 should not eat more than a tablespoon of chia seeds.

Chia seeds are gluten-free. They can also be digested in the whole form without having to ground them for your body to absorb them better.

Chia seeds are good for helping regulate insulin levels.

Chia Seeds are great for making you feel full. What happens is the seeds have a gelling property that when added to anything can make you feel fuller than you are.

Chia Seeds are also loaded with fiber. And we know that a high-fiber diet can prevent chronic diseases.

Calcium can be hard on some people to ingest through dairy products. Chia Seeds are just another alternative to getting the calcium you need.

Essential oils in chia leaves have repellent properties against insects, making it suitable for organic cultivation.

Cautions:

“Chia Seeds can absorb up to 27 times their weight in water”, said study author Dr. Rebecca Rawl, from Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte, N.C., People with a history of swallowing problems or esophageal issues, should definitely let them soak in a drink to fully expand prior to drinking.

Chia Seeds may bloat, constipate and give you stomach cramps.

 

 

Uncategorized

17 Impressive Benefits of Rosemary(2 min read)

matt-montgomery-3790 (2)Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) is a fragrant perennial evergreen herb with needle-like leaves with white, pink, blue or purple flowers native to the Mediterranean. The name rosemary derives from the Latin ros meaning “dew” and marinus meaning “sea”, “sea dew.” Rosemary is a member of the mint family Lamiaceae, along with many other herbs, such as oregano, thyme, basil, and lavender.  Rosemary is a good source of iron, calcium, and vitamin B-6.

Rosemary has been used for thousands of years for medicinal purposes along with used in recipes for cooking.

For your hair, rubbing rosemary herb extractions over the scalp to stimulate the hair-bulbs, prevent premature baldness and dandruff.

Rosemary has been tested in clinical studies on the list below and has shown positive feedback from them.

Health Benefits of Rosemary

  • Improve mood
  • Relieve pain
  • Protect the immune system
  • Stimulate circulation
  • Detoxify the body
  • Bacterial infections
  • Premature aging
  • Skin conditions
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Anti-oxidant
  • Memory and concentration
  • Digestion
  • Neurological
  • Cancer
  • Alzheimer’s
  • Macular degeneration
  • Hair

Caution:  The essential oil of rosemary is not to be consumed. You can consume rosemary as we have for thousands of years in culinary aspects, but again, not as an essential oil. Don’t forget rosemary is in the mint family, so if you are allergic, be careful.

References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3624774/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3736918/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20377818

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3905473/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4227022/

http://www.amd.org/macular-degeneration-research/clinical-trials-for-wet-amd/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5133115/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23921795

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25002023

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3569896/

Uncategorized

10 Health Benefits from Potassium

Potassium K

Potassium is a very important mineral for the proper function of all cells, tissues, and organs in the human body.  It is also an electrolyte, a substance that conducts electricity in the body, along with sodium, chloride, calcium, and magnesium. Potassium is crucial to heart function and plays a key role in skeletal and smooth muscle contraction, making it important for normal digestive and muscular function. Potassium is one of the seven essential macro minerals, along with calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, chloride, and sulfur.

The Oregon State University recommends an intake of 4700 milligrams per day in adults. They also state that people do not get nearly the recommended amount daily. Humans use to consume a diet high in potassium, until recently with the increasing consumption of processed foods, which potassium is removed from, humans are not receiving the daily recommended amount. If you are eating a lot of processed foods, you may consider supplements, but always ask your doctor first.

Medical News Today says that for individuals with healthy kidneys, excess amounts of potassium are efficiently excreted in urine with no adverse side effects. There have been a small number of reports of potassium toxicity associated with an extremely high intake of potassium supplements. No potassium toxicity has ever been reported related to food consumption. Medical News today also stated that consuming too much potassium can be harmful to those whose kidneys are not fully functional. Some sports supplements and salt substitutes contain high levels of potassium, which have been linked to two cases of cardiac arrest. If your kidneys are unable to remove excess potassium from the blood, it could be fatal due to the effects of potassium on the heart.

A studies conducted at the Cardiac and Vascular Sciences, St George’s, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London, UK., and the Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA., state a diet rich in potassium has shown health benefits in lowering blood pressure in individuals with both raised blood pressure and average population blood pressure, increasing potassium intake reduces cardiovascular disease mortality. The study also stated that a high-potassium diet may also prevent or at least slow the progression of renal disease. Reduced serum potassium increases the risk of lethal ventricular arrhythmias in patients with ischemic heart disease, heart failure and left ventricular hypertrophy, and increasing potassium intake may prevent this. The best way to increase potassium intake is to increase the consumption of fruits and vegetables.

Bone Health – Studies on bone health have shown that a diet rich in potassium may play a role in preventing osteoporosis in an elderly woman.  A study showed that an increased potassium intake lowers urinary calcium excretion and plays an important role in the management of hypercalciuria and kidney stones and is likely to decrease the risk of osteoporosis

Hypokalemia – Having low potassium is called Hypokalemia, which includes weakness, lack of energy, muscle cramps, stomach disturbances, an irregular heartbeat, and an abnormal EKG (electrocardiogram, a test that measures heart function). Hypokalemia usually happens when the body loses too much potassium in the urine or intestines.

Heart Disease – There have been studies in heart disease that have shown that people with a higher sodium-potassium ratio have a higher risk of heart disease.

IBD (Irritable Bowel Disease) – People with IBD (Ulcerative Colitis or Crohn Disease) often have trouble absorbing nutrients from their intestines, and may have low levels of potassium and other important nutrients. If are suffering from IBD, your doctor may recommend a supplement after checking your potassium levels.

Brain Function – UC Davis did a study showing that potassium channels play a key role in maintaining the electrical conductivity of the brain and dramatically affect brain function. And that brain cell activity is diminished when potassium channels are open. Closed channels lead to an increase in neuron excitability.

Electrolytes – Potassium has electrolytes which are great for keeping healthy levels of fluids in the body which is critical for your body to function. Electrolytes help to transmit electrical charges from the nervous system and brain.

Nervous System – Potassium helps to boost the efficiency of nerve reflexes that transmit a message from one body part to another.

Metabolism – Potassium helps the metabolic processing of various nutrients like fats and carbohydrates. Which means potassium is great at extracting the energy from the nutrients that are consumed.

Anxiety and Stress – Potassium can help regulate hormones in the body including stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline.

Diabetes – Low serum potassium is strongly related to glucose intolerance, and increasing potassium intake may prevent the development of diabetes that occurs with prolonged treatment with thiazide diuretics.

Foods that are rich in potassium

Potato

Sweet potato

Avocado

Cantaloupe

Mushrooms

Beet greens

White beans

Tomatoes

Soybeans

Lima beans

Winter squash

Banana

Spinach

Yogurt, low fat, plain

Pear

Mango

Orange

Pistachio

Raisins